It was The Best, and the Worst

Dave 07What was arguably the most important election in Canadian history is over, and with apologies to Mr. Dickens, it’s now the Best of Times and it’s the Worst of Times.

First, the Worst. Easy. Canadians are once again faced with the prospect of an “always drive in the left ditch” government led by the childlike tyrant, Justin Trudeau.

More Worst? The Liberals will have a minority government and will often need to be propped up by that reality challenged duo, Jagmeet Singh and Elizabeth May. They are are determined to shut down Canada’s largest export industry, and, at the same time, increase jobs, and also borrow for more goodies like a universal drug program. Perhaps they’re already, over-indulging beneficiaries of Mr. Trudeau’s legacy, legalized marijuana?

The Best of times? When newly elected Montréal Liberal MP and rabid anti-oil activist, Steven Guilbeault was asked about the Trans Mountain pipeline, he said that it was “a done deal” and that the Liberals were going to move on to other climate initiatives. I turned to Meritha and said: “That’s the most important utterance this evening”. It suggested to me that Trudeau probably does intend to go ahead with the TMX pipeline, and, if true, and admittedly that’s a big IF, they will have the support of the Conservatives. On TMX at least, Elizabeth May and Jagmeet Singh can go pound sand. The completion of Trans Mountain and the Keystone XL would have a major positive impact on Alberta’s economy.

The other Best is simply that the Liberals won. Ok, go douse your hair! Yes it’s a positive because that will be the catalyst – it’s already happening – that will ignite a serious separatist movement in the West. If you think Sheer would, or could have turned it around, the thought: “A triumph of hope over reality” comes to mind.

60% of the vote went to political parties that have vowed to shut down an industry which is a major driver of the Canadian economic activity, but happens to be located in the West. I don’t think the message to us from the rest of Canada could have been any clearer. We were flipped the bird.

As it is currently constituted, Canada is dysfunctional and is not fixable, and its Constitution virtually guarantees that it cannot be fixed unless we change the Constitution.

EqualizationSo the only possible way that Canada could be fixed is by the West emulating Québec and threatening to leave. Québec’s secession threats are serious but they’re not credible because they can’t afford to leave. Ours must be serious, and would be credible, because we can’t afford to stay.

So now what? First thing, our various separatist groups must unify. To lead, we must elect credible, serious, and moderate women and men who, in the words of Alexander Hamilton, one of the framers of the US Constitution, are committed to creating a … “good government from reflection and choice.”

We’ll then need a separatist party with provincial and federal branches. Eventually they must win governments in the West, and win a strong presence in the Canadian Parliament.

There must be a referendum on separation with a question that is legally and logically clear, and won by at least 60% of the vote. And then we must negotiate a place in Confederation similar to Québec’s, where the maximum possible autonomy is given to the West, and where it is equal to other regions in every respect.

If that is agreed to it would probably make sense for us to remain within Canada. But failing that, a major marketing campaign must be undertaken to explain our position to the world, and serious separation negotiations must be commenced.

To those who say it can’t be done, I’ll say this. At the Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedom, George Jonas awards dinner the other evening, JCCF President John Carpay, related that when he visited Poland in 1987, people constantly told him that under communism things never changed, wouldn’t change, and couldn’t change because the Communists were so entrenched. Two years later the Berlin Wall came down.

Remember that as we continue to examine Alberta and Saskatchewan’s future within, or without Canada.

For our grand-kids, and yours

I’m Dave Reesor

Please LIKE and SHARE if you agree that this is an important discussion.

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One Comment on “It was The Best, and the Worst”

  1. Cecil and Inge Hards November 6, 2019 at 10:57 AM #

    We believe that a serious discussion on Western separation needs to be carefully considered.

    I would be interested in reviewing the economic analysis and viability of a separation.
    Unlike Quebec it appears that the West has an economic advantage should it separate.

    Where does one look for the Financial data that has been presented?

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