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Separation. The Task Ahead.

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In previous blogs, I’ve mentioned the Economic Education Association conference held in Red Deer earlier in November. We were there, and the lineup of thoughtful and knowledgeable speakers was the most impressive of any conference that we’ve ever attended.

I’m going to blog about several presentations over the next few weeks, and months, but I think that the one by Marco Navarro-Genie of Haultain Research laid out the prior conditions that we must create before we are ready to have a referendum on Alberta separation.

For those of us that are determined that our children and grandchildren and great-grandchildren will have the best possible future, whether within  a massively revised Canada, or in the new nation of Alberta, we need to think about these carefully. We’re not going anywhere unless we coalesce around a central idea of what Alberta independence would look like, and, in order to get there, we’re going to need to fully  understand the scope and duration of the task ahead.

Here are the conditions that existed before the 1995 Québec referendum as Navarro-Genie outlined them.

  1. “Have the Support of the Premier”. We do not. If Jason Kenney is being forthright, he’s said unequivocally that he is now and forevermore a Federalist. He might change his stance at sometime in the future, but I doubt it. Therefore, a separatist party must find a leader that can beat Jason Kenney in the next, or subsequent election, and be ahead of him by enough that it doesn’t allow another four years of NDP chaos. We’re not even close.
  2. Have control of the legislature and institutions. Next election is 3 ½ years from now, so realistically we are looking at least 7 ½ years.
  3. Have informal institutions, like support groups etc.. A long way to go.
  4. Have the support of business, labour and professional organizations. Long way to go.
  5. Ottawa Representatives. We need a separatist party with a federal wing with members in Parliament. Not even close.
  6. We need steady and strong support of the population. But committed separatists are currently at about 35%. Long way to go.
  7. Support or media neutrality. Ha ha ha ha! And we never will. We’ll have to work around that using social media. And we can.
  8. Indifference of the rest of Canada. Now maybe, but eight or 10 years from now when they realize that we’re serious? They’ll rag the puck on every issue and Supreme Court us to death. And of course, lie about us 24/7. By that time, we need to be strong and independent enough to walk out unilaterally.
  9. Weak Prime Minister and central government. Yes! Finally, a yes. But, will we have Justin Trudeau 6 or 8 or 10 years from now? We can’t count on it.

So it seems to me that we have a big project ahead of us, and I’ve been involved in enough projects to know that the first thing you do is sit down and assemble facts. Then you think. Lots. Then you make a plan. Then you adjust your plan constantly as you go forward, and new circumstances arise. A week is a long time in politics and we’re talking about a 10 to 20-year project.

facebook_1554407681260So why do it? Well, I’ve always believed that if it’s a good and thing, and if there is no intrinsic reason that it can’t be done, then it should be done. We have eight grandchildren and six bonus grandchildren and a three-year-old great-grandson named Emmett. So this project is for ours, and for yours. Maybe Emmett’s pointing to a brighter future!

I’m Dave Reesor.

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GID Sports, and other endeavors.

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Alberta Politics Alberta Separtism Canadian Politics Politics Uncategorized

Here’s why I’m a separatist

dwr.jpgThis is a note that I sent to the Chairman of the recent Essentials of Freedom conference in Red Deer Alberta, which was sponsored by the Economic Education Association. An absolutely exceptional conference! For clarity I’ve editorially expanded on points that I made in the note.

Dear Danny

Here’s why I’m a separatist

I thought Maxime (Bernier) gave an exceptional speech and would that he was Canada’s prime minister. But I think his belief that Confederation can be fixed or that Alberta separatism will meet the same fate as Québec separatism is quite misguided.

Quebec and Alberta are not the same, and a thoughtful and strategic separatist movement in the West, particularly Alberta, would encounter fundamentally different realities than Quebec.

Quebec has been propped up and coddled and subsidized by Canadian taxpayers since Confederation in 1867. On the other hand, since their formation in 1905, Alberta and Saskatchewan have been regarded as colonies of the Laurentian group. (Sir John A Macdonald actually used the word, colonies.) The Laurentian Group is the entirely self-serving alliance of corporations and politicians, and bureaucrats centered in the Ottawa, Toronto and Montreal triangle.

BuffaloIn 1905, when it was proposed that a province called Buffalo be carved out of the Northwest Territories,  the Laurentian Group, together with the Liberal government, decided that a province as large as Québec or Ontario might pose a future threat to their domination of the Dominion. So they ran an arbitrary line right down the middle and created Alberta and Saskatchewan. There was no rational reason for it except to keep Alberta and Saskatchewan small enough that they could be controlled.

It’s never stopped. For 30 years, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba fought to gain the same control of their natural resources, as every other province had had had since Confederation. We were successful with that, but then, in 1968, Trudeau the First brought in the National Energy Program which was a direct attack on Alberta’s resources. Even until now we continue to face endless policies and programs aimed directly against the interests of the West.

Pete Reesor CabinA personal story. I learned about how Canada’s government operates when I was about 15 years old. My grandfather is pictured on my Facebook page in front of the log cabin he originally built in 1902 near Fort Walsh, Northwest Territories. Next year he moved the cabin 40 miles down Battle Creek, and in 1910, using horses, he and a couple of other ranchers began constructing an irrigation system which has been, even until now, invaluable on the bone-dry prairie of Southwest Saskatchewan. It now encompasses about 10,000 acres, owned by dozens of farmers and ranchers.

In the dirty 30s year of 1935, it was taken over by the federal Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Association, PFRA, with the written agreement, that in exchange for his 25 years of hard labour and expense, he and his heirs and successors, in perpetuity, would receive water for a specified number of acres at a specified rate per acre foot. Just over 20 years later, my dad got a letter from the PFRA informing him that the allowed acreage was being cut and the charge for water was going to be the same as for everyone else.

Since then I’ve understood exactly why our aboriginal people regard promises from Canada’s government, which usually blather “…as long as the sun shines, the grass grows, and the rivers/waters flow”, as proceeding from a forked tongue. These agreements should have an addendum saying “…. or until we change our minds”.

For the Prairie provinces it’s been totally consistent. Every time we think they’re letting us up, we’re hammered back down. That’s a completely different experience than Quebec. Compare Trudeau’s unethical, (and likely illegal), support of the famously corrupt SNC Lavalin, and his Pierre like shrug about Encana.

The second difference between Alberta and Québec is very simple.

Quebec can’t afford to separate; Alberta can’t afford to stay.

Thanks Danny!

I’m Dave Reesor

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Gender Identity Disorder Social Issues Transgender rights Uncategorized

GID Sports, and other endeavors.

dwr.jpgMale athletes who are noncompetitive in men sports, can now announce that they are henceforth a woman, and then, brazenly insist that they must be allowed to compete in women’s sports. Unsurprisingly, they make out like bandits, which they sort of are.

I mean, aren’t they stealing medals and trophies and records from real women, who, through no fault of their own, are on average lighter, and with much less muscle mass and upper body strength than biological men? Real female athletes are getting fed up with it, although many hold their tongue for fear of being ostracized or booted by spineless, politically correct sports organizations. Look at the picture. What exactly is the guy in the middle proud of?  Do you believe that this is fair?

Transgender man on podium

So far, no one seems to have had a clear solution. I do!

Here’s the definition of GID. “Gender identity disorders (GID) are disorders in which an individual exhibits marked and persistent identification with the opposite sex.” It’s real, but the current solution is destroying women’s sports. The acronym GID is rarely used in daily conversation, but it should be.

So, I am proposing some new sports divisions. We now have men’s divisions, women’s divisions, and special divisions for athletes with disabilities, including the Special Olympics. How about a new category of sport called GID. With GID Divisions.

Transgender “women” wishing to compete with their peers could compete in GIDD basketball, GIDD hockey, GIDD shot-put, etc., and of course the GIDD Olympics.

And for those of us not directly involved in the psychiatric or medical profession, rather than having to keep track of who knows how many genders, why couldn’t we simply refer to any individual with a Gender Identity Disorder, as having GID? I had an extremely intelligent and rational friend who had GID, and I’m positive he would agree.

I think it’s an acronym whose time has come!

Next few blogs I’ll be reporting on the Essentials of Freedom Conference in Red Deer. There were many, many well informed and thoughtful speakers. It’s a conference which is absolutely essential for those interested in the welfare of their children and grandchildren. We’ll let you know when the next one is coming along.

I’m Dave Reesor

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Categories
Alberta Politics Alberta Separtism Canadian Politics Politics Uncategorized

Jason got it right!

Jason KenneyI spent an hour listening to Jason Kenney’s Manning Conference speech. You should too. I know Jason just a little bit, and it’s exactly what I expected. It’s strategic, almost down to the last detail.

For the last number of months I’ve been calling myself a separatist but maybe I should change that and call myself an independentist. (That’s the English version) I’m convinced that separation may still eventually be necessary, and good – separation is our trump card and the rest of Canada needs to understand that we’re holding it – but it’s way too early to play it now.

Consider this. Let’s say the provincial government held a referendum on separation and it won, even by 75%, then what? No seriously, then what?

Most Alberta taxpayers have their paychecks deposited directly to their bank accounts and their taxes are automatically withdrawn and sent to Ottawa. How do you talk a meaningful number of companies into withholding those taxes? And then they would send them where? And what kind of fines would the company risk?

If you’re self-employed and you withhold taxes from the federal government, your bank account will be seized and the taxes withdrawn. You’ll pay a penalty and interest and probably be fined. How would you fight that? Our provincial police force is the RCMP and they’re controlled by Ottawa.

Controlling the collection of taxes in Alberta and having our own provincial police force are critical steps that must be taken before we begin to talk about a Triple E Senate, immigration control, and other steps towards independence. And certainly before a referendum on separation.

Separatist movements must continue growing and coalescing and gaining credibility. The stronger and more credible our separatist movement is, the stronger Alberta’s negotiating position is with the rest of Canada.

But here’s what those separation movements must not do. They must not tolerate anyone who advocates or hints at violence. They must not tolerate anyone who insists on riding their personal hobbyhorse into the movement; issues like gun-control which do ultimately belong within provincial jurisdiction, or truly arcane issues like whether the Bank of Canada is a legitimate institution.

There must initially be a total focus on organizing our own police force. That will take time, plus it will take two years to get out of the contract with the RCMP. And like Québec we must collect our own taxes, and better yet, those that go to the feds. That would give us enormous bargaining power.

dwr.jpgMeritha and I are heading to the Essentials of Freedom Conference in Red Deer on Friday and Saturday, November 15 and 16th. There will be many knowledgeable speakers debating the merits of eventual separation vs the merits of simply obtaining a Quebec level of independence from Ottawa. If you are able, you really should go. Here’s the link.

One more comment about Jason Kenney’s speech. I was a bit disappointed when he said: “I am, and always will be a patriotic Canadian.” As a provincial premier who was not elected on a separatist platform, he has to say that “I am” but saying …. “I always will be” could be a promise that he’ll be compelled to break at some point in the future. We’ll have to see.

I’m Dave Reesor

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Climate Environmentalism Oilsands Science Uncategorized

Oilsands Reclamation Reality

dwr.jpgBetter than before. That’s often the result of reclamation projects in Alberta’s oilsands. This link takes you to a series of photos, including some before and after shots, of what is happening.

I also included a letter I wrote to The Economist magazine regarding their abysmally unbalanced coverage of Canada’s oil industry, and particularly the oilsands.

Dear Editors

As a long-time subscriber to The Economist, I’ve been well aware of your unrelenting campaign against the Canadian oilsands. In your latest article on Saudi Arabia’s petroleum industry you rank the oilsands as one of the most polluting energy sources in the world.

I suspect you’re referring to CO2, or what you erroneously call Carbon, but you failed to mention that CO2 emissions from oilsands production have come down precipitously in the last 30 years. What you also have never mentioned, as far as I know, is the fact that as the oilsands mining is completed, the terrain is restored to the same, or an even higher level of biodiversity than existed before mining began. And an increasing area of the oilsands is now being exploited using an in-situ process which disturbs very little terrain.

I’ve included the link to an article with some beforesyncrude_mildred's_lake_reclamation and after oilsands mining photos. Would it be possible for you to send your North American correspondent to Fort McMurray to take an objective look at the mining operation, and to also explore the fact that the oilsands provide excellent employment to tens of thousands of people from around the world, and most importantly, to Canada’s natives that live in the area.Mildred_Lake_oil_sands_mine__Syncrude_Canada_Ltd.

Unlike in Saudi Arabia, Canada’s native employees get paid exactly the same as any other Albertan or Canadian or individual from overseas. Saudi Arabia treats its immigrant employees appallingly. Nigerian oil is produced in environmental squalor and corruption, as is much of the other oil from OPEC.

Canadian oil is, quite arguably, the most ethically produced oil in the world. In the interests of balance, could you do an article about that?

Yours sincerely

Dave W Reesor

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

If you agree, LIKE and SHARE this blog.  And write a note to The Economist. letters@economist.com