Oilsands Reclamation Reality

dwr.jpgBetter than before. That’s often the result of reclamation projects in Alberta’s oilsands. This link takes you to a series of photos, including some before and after shots, of what is happening.

I also included a letter I wrote to The Economist magazine regarding their abysmally unbalanced coverage of Canada’s oil industry, and particularly the oilsands.

Dear Editors

As a long-time subscriber to The Economist, I’ve been well aware of your unrelenting campaign against the Canadian oilsands. In your latest article on Saudi Arabia’s petroleum industry you rank the oilsands as one of the most polluting energy sources in the world.

I suspect you’re referring to CO2, or what you erroneously call Carbon, but you failed to mention that CO2 emissions from oilsands production have come down precipitously in the last 30 years. What you also have never mentioned, as far as I know, is the fact that as the oilsands mining is completed, the terrain is restored to the same, or an even higher level of biodiversity than existed before mining began. And an increasing area of the oilsands is now being exploited using an in-situ process which disturbs very little terrain.

I’ve included the link to an article with some beforesyncrude_mildred's_lake_reclamation and after oilsands mining photos. Would it be possible for you to send your North American correspondent to Fort McMurray to take an objective look at the mining operation, and to also explore the fact that the oilsands provide excellent employment to tens of thousands of people from around the world, and most importantly, to Canada’s natives that live in the area.Mildred_Lake_oil_sands_mine__Syncrude_Canada_Ltd.

Unlike in Saudi Arabia, Canada’s native employees get paid exactly the same as any other Albertan or Canadian or individual from overseas. Saudi Arabia treats its immigrant employees appallingly. Nigerian oil is produced in environmental squalor and corruption, as is much of the other oil from OPEC.

Canadian oil is, quite arguably, the most ethically produced oil in the world. In the interests of balance, could you do an article about that?

Yours sincerely

Dave W Reesor

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

If you agree, LIKE and SHARE this blog.  And write a note to The Economist. letters@economist.com

 

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