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Alberta Politics Alberta Separtism Canadian Politics Democrats Politics US Politics

Battles. Trudeau vs the West, Trump vs Biden

I looked this up. The Prime Minister … “… determines the general direction of Government’s activities ….”

So what is the general direction of the Liberal government’s activities under leadership of Justin Trudeau? If you can go by the past five years and the recent throne speech, and his follow-up content-less address to the nation, and his further follow-up, platitude-ridden address to the United Nations, it would seem that Canada’s direction is Progressivist virtue signalling, full throttle, at any cost.

And away from the interests of Alberta and Saskatchewan, and consequently, the interests of Canada. We’re going green! green! green!, with absolutely no regard for or recognition of the disastrous “going green” experiences of Ontario and Germany and Japan. Instead of only Ontario residents experiencing massive increases in their cost of heat and electricity, the Trudeau government wants equality of misery for all Canadians. Besides, it’s well-established that “going green” isn’t green.

M998.51.1 | Pierre Elliott Trudeau's Famous Finger | Drawing, cartoon | Serge Chapleau | McCord MuseumRather than recognizing the centrality of the petroleum industry to Alberta’s economy and to Canada’s economic well-being, Justin Trudeau has kicked sand in Albertan’s faces, again. Or perhaps flipped us the bird like his father did 50 years ago. There was absolutely nothing in the throne speech to help Alberta in its dire straights in spite of the fact that Albertans have contributed over 600 billion net dollars to Canada over the past 60 years.

Trudeau almost seems determined to give Albertans justification to separate. It’s working, and if Justin Trudeau or Jason Kenney think the separatist movement is a myth, or that it’s just people blowing off steam, they need to give their heads a shake. When you have world class economists like Jack Mintz saying that it might become the only option, then you’d better take it seriously! As I’ve said before, when people in Québec voted, many knew that Québec couldn’t afford to go. Albertans are increasingly aware that they can’t afford to stay.

And a brief note on the US Presidential election. Over the past couple of months, it’s been well-established, by Joe Biden, that Joe Biden is a racist. (To a black journalist Biden said that if he, the black journalist, wasn’t voting Democrat, he wasn’t black.) It’s also well-established that he’s fond of fondling, and  there is credible evidence that he committed rape. (The woman who accuses him is willing to take a lie detector test. Joe Biden isn’t.) The Ukrainian and Chinese revelations are also well on the way to establishing that he is also blatantly corrupt.

And while Biden is unable to point to any significant accomplishment during his 48 years in public office, in just three years Trump was able to: Establish a roaring US economy with record low black unemployment, record high black employment, new investment in the blighted inner cities where Democrats rule but have done nothing, brought in reforms that released thousands of over sentenced prisoners, read the riot act to China regarding their intellectual property theft and unfair trade practices, and called out NATO members for reneging on their commitment to spend 2% of their GDP on defense. I’m not a Trump the person fan, but I am definitely a Trump the President fan.

I know a number of people that exhibit full blown Trump Derangement Syndrome, which means being incapable, and I mean, literally incapable, of acknowledging any of the positive things that Trump has done. It’s a troubling phenomenon and I suspect that some day it will become the subject of psychological studies.

Anyway, that’s the view from here. Meritha is making good progress after her cancer surgery, and in a couple of months she’ll be fit, and spoiled, and rebuilding the honey-do list, and…….I’m in trouble!

I’m Dave Reesor

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Alberta Politics Alberta Separtism Canadian Election Canadian Politics Freedom Politics Saskatchewan Politics Uncategorized

INDEPENDENCE. What we must and mustn’t do.

dwr.jpgThe Canadian federal election turned out to pretty much as expected, with a Liberal minority government that will be propped up by the NDP and Green Party. I think it’s important to note that if the Liberals are telling the truth about their intent to push forward with TMX or Trans Mountain pipeline, they can count on the Conservatives to support them on that issue.

But Canadians have spoken, and two thirds of them obviously continue to view Alberta and Saskatchewan as whiny rednecks and knuckle-draggers, complaining about nothing more than the fact that they send billions to the rest of the country and are blocked by the rest of the country from getting the resources that produced the billions, to market. Why would anyone complain about that?

So, Alberta and Saskatchewan need to construct a thoughtful, moderate, but absolutely serious separatist movement. Can we do it? It’s been a personal mantra of mine that if something needs to be done, and there’s no intrinsic reason that it can’t be done, then it should be done. Dozens of countries have won independence in the last hundred years, many of them peacefully. That must be our objective.

The various separatist groups need to come together and compare principles, and then after carefully, courageously, and completely, thinking through and negotiating the kind of country we want for our children and grandchildren, form one unified movement from which will flow:

  • A declaration of our reasons to seek independence;
  • A constitution based on MAGNA CARTA and British Common Law, and borrowing from the best of the US, and Australian, and Swiss forms of government.
  • A Political Party with both provincial and federal branches.

And here’s where it gets tricky and of equal importance. It’s what we must not do.

Westerners are already regarded as gun toting, woman suppressing, racist, homophobic, etc. etc., ad nauseum. It’s categorically not true. Most Albertans don’t own guns and most of those who do use them responsibly. Alberta’s women were the first, in the British Empire, to win the vote. Alberta’s most famous and revered cattleman was John Ware, an emancipated slave from South Carolina. Alberta had Canada’s first mosque in the 1930s, its first Muslim cabinet minister in the 1970s, and Calgary has Canada’s first Muslim mayor. He’s turned out to be a dud, but that’s a different discussion.

SilverbergCalgary also had Canada’s first woman Chief of Police, and she happened to be Jewish. I know of no one that objected. People of all ethnic backgrounds, colors and sexual orientations are integrated into and involved in every area of Western life.

But we’ve allowed Central Canada to brand us, and those of us who are seeking independence must be extremely careful about what we say and what we say it about. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t tell the truth, but we must be certain that it is the truth, based on facts, and useful.

We must sideline xenophobes. I for one have no interest in a country that accepts or rejects immigrants based on their ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, etc.. That does not mean for one minute that I don’t believe that immigrants must be vetted, extremely carefully, accepting only those who can convince well-trained immigration agents that they are coming to our country to get away from toxic cultures and religious practices that are antithetical to our Judeo Christian-based Western civilization.

And we should write it into our Constitution that individuals that go back on that agreement can be sent back to their country of origin, expeditiously.

Final thought. While some countries have gained independence through violence, there are many who have done it peaceably. That’s all we should be interested in. People who talk about how many guns they have or how they would like to eliminate politicians that they disagree with, should be summarily expelled from any serious separatist movement. If you want to confirm your knuckle-dragger bona fides, do it on your own.

I’m Dave Reesor

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Alberta Politics Alberta Separtism Canadian Politics Politics Uncategorized

Here’s why I’m a separatist

dwr.jpgThis is a note that I sent to the Chairman of the recent Essentials of Freedom conference in Red Deer Alberta, which was sponsored by the Economic Education Association. An absolutely exceptional conference! For clarity I’ve editorially expanded on points that I made in the note.

Dear Danny

Here’s why I’m a separatist

I thought Maxime (Bernier) gave an exceptional speech and would that he was Canada’s prime minister. But I think his belief that Confederation can be fixed or that Alberta separatism will meet the same fate as Québec separatism is quite misguided.

Quebec and Alberta are not the same, and a thoughtful and strategic separatist movement in the West, particularly Alberta, would encounter fundamentally different realities than Quebec.

Quebec has been propped up and coddled and subsidized by Canadian taxpayers since Confederation in 1867. On the other hand, since their formation in 1905, Alberta and Saskatchewan have been regarded as colonies of the Laurentian group. (Sir John A Macdonald actually used the word, colonies.) The Laurentian Group is the entirely self-serving alliance of corporations and politicians, and bureaucrats centered in the Ottawa, Toronto and Montreal triangle.

BuffaloIn 1905, when it was proposed that a province called Buffalo be carved out of the Northwest Territories,  the Laurentian Group, together with the Liberal government, decided that a province as large as Québec or Ontario might pose a future threat to their domination of the Dominion. So they ran an arbitrary line right down the middle and created Alberta and Saskatchewan. There was no rational reason for it except to keep Alberta and Saskatchewan small enough that they could be controlled.

It’s never stopped. For 30 years, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba fought to gain the same control of their natural resources, as every other province had had had since Confederation. We were successful with that, but then, in 1968, Trudeau the First brought in the National Energy Program which was a direct attack on Alberta’s resources. Even until now we continue to face endless policies and programs aimed directly against the interests of the West.

Pete Reesor CabinA personal story. I learned about how Canada’s government operates when I was about 15 years old. My grandfather is pictured on my Facebook page in front of the log cabin he originally built in 1902 near Fort Walsh, Northwest Territories. Next year he moved the cabin 40 miles down Battle Creek, and in 1910, using horses, he and a couple of other ranchers began constructing an irrigation system which has been, even until now, invaluable on the bone-dry prairie of Southwest Saskatchewan. It now encompasses about 10,000 acres, owned by dozens of farmers and ranchers.

In the dirty 30s year of 1935, it was taken over by the federal Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Association, PFRA, with the written agreement, that in exchange for his 25 years of hard labour and expense, he and his heirs and successors, in perpetuity, would receive water for a specified number of acres at a specified rate per acre foot. Just over 20 years later, my dad got a letter from the PFRA informing him that the allowed acreage was being cut and the charge for water was going to be the same as for everyone else.

Since then I’ve understood exactly why our aboriginal people regard promises from Canada’s government, which usually blather “…as long as the sun shines, the grass grows, and the rivers/waters flow”, as proceeding from a forked tongue. These agreements should have an addendum saying “…. or until we change our minds”.

For the Prairie provinces it’s been totally consistent. Every time we think they’re letting us up, we’re hammered back down. That’s a completely different experience than Quebec. Compare Trudeau’s unethical, (and likely illegal), support of the famously corrupt SNC Lavalin, and his Pierre like shrug about Encana.

The second difference between Alberta and Québec is very simple.

Quebec can’t afford to separate; Alberta can’t afford to stay.

Thanks Danny!

I’m Dave Reesor

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Jason got it right!

Jason KenneyI spent an hour listening to Jason Kenney’s Manning Conference speech. You should too. I know Jason just a little bit, and it’s exactly what I expected. It’s strategic, almost down to the last detail.

For the last number of months I’ve been calling myself a separatist but maybe I should change that and call myself an independentist. (That’s the English version) I’m convinced that separation may still eventually be necessary, and good – separation is our trump card and the rest of Canada needs to understand that we’re holding it – but it’s way too early to play it now.

Consider this. Let’s say the provincial government held a referendum on separation and it won, even by 75%, then what? No seriously, then what?

Most Alberta taxpayers have their paychecks deposited directly to their bank accounts and their taxes are automatically withdrawn and sent to Ottawa. How do you talk a meaningful number of companies into withholding those taxes? And then they would send them where? And what kind of fines would the company risk?

If you’re self-employed and you withhold taxes from the federal government, your bank account will be seized and the taxes withdrawn. You’ll pay a penalty and interest and probably be fined. How would you fight that? Our provincial police force is the RCMP and they’re controlled by Ottawa.

Controlling the collection of taxes in Alberta and having our own provincial police force are critical steps that must be taken before we begin to talk about a Triple E Senate, immigration control, and other steps towards independence. And certainly before a referendum on separation.

Separatist movements must continue growing and coalescing and gaining credibility. The stronger and more credible our separatist movement is, the stronger Alberta’s negotiating position is with the rest of Canada.

But here’s what those separation movements must not do. They must not tolerate anyone who advocates or hints at violence. They must not tolerate anyone who insists on riding their personal hobbyhorse into the movement; issues like gun-control which do ultimately belong within provincial jurisdiction, or truly arcane issues like whether the Bank of Canada is a legitimate institution.

There must initially be a total focus on organizing our own police force. That will take time, plus it will take two years to get out of the contract with the RCMP. And like Québec we must collect our own taxes, and better yet, those that go to the feds. That would give us enormous bargaining power.

dwr.jpgMeritha and I are heading to the Essentials of Freedom Conference in Red Deer on Friday and Saturday, November 15 and 16th. There will be many knowledgeable speakers debating the merits of eventual separation vs the merits of simply obtaining a Quebec level of independence from Ottawa. If you are able, you really should go. Here’s the link.

One more comment about Jason Kenney’s speech. I was a bit disappointed when he said: “I am, and always will be a patriotic Canadian.” As a provincial premier who was not elected on a separatist platform, he has to say that “I am” but saying …. “I always will be” could be a promise that he’ll be compelled to break at some point in the future. We’ll have to see.

I’m Dave Reesor

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It was The Best, and the Worst

Dave 07What was arguably the most important election in Canadian history is over, and with apologies to Mr. Dickens, it’s now the Best of Times and it’s the Worst of Times.

First, the Worst. Easy. Canadians are once again faced with the prospect of an “always drive in the left ditch” government led by the childlike tyrant, Justin Trudeau.

More Worst? The Liberals will have a minority government and will often need to be propped up by that reality challenged duo, Jagmeet Singh and Elizabeth May. They are are determined to shut down Canada’s largest export industry, and, at the same time, increase jobs, and also borrow for more goodies like a universal drug program. Perhaps they’re already, over-indulging beneficiaries of Mr. Trudeau’s legacy, legalized marijuana?

The Best of times? When newly elected Montréal Liberal MP and rabid anti-oil activist, Steven Guilbeault was asked about the Trans Mountain pipeline, he said that it was “a done deal” and that the Liberals were going to move on to other climate initiatives. I turned to Meritha and said: “That’s the most important utterance this evening”. It suggested to me that Trudeau probably does intend to go ahead with the TMX pipeline, and, if true, and admittedly that’s a big IF, they will have the support of the Conservatives. On TMX at least, Elizabeth May and Jagmeet Singh can go pound sand. The completion of Trans Mountain and the Keystone XL would have a major positive impact on Alberta’s economy.

The other Best is simply that the Liberals won. Ok, go douse your hair! Yes it’s a positive because that will be the catalyst – it’s already happening – that will ignite a serious separatist movement in the West. If you think Sheer would, or could have turned it around, the thought: “A triumph of hope over reality” comes to mind.

60% of the vote went to political parties that have vowed to shut down an industry which is a major driver of the Canadian economic activity, but happens to be located in the West. I don’t think the message to us from the rest of Canada could have been any clearer. We were flipped the bird.

As it is currently constituted, Canada is dysfunctional and is not fixable, and its Constitution virtually guarantees that it cannot be fixed unless we change the Constitution.

EqualizationSo the only possible way that Canada could be fixed is by the West emulating Québec and threatening to leave. Québec’s secession threats are serious but they’re not credible because they can’t afford to leave. Ours must be serious, and would be credible, because we can’t afford to stay.

So now what? First thing, our various separatist groups must unify. To lead, we must elect credible, serious, and moderate women and men who, in the words of Alexander Hamilton, one of the framers of the US Constitution, are committed to creating a … “good government from reflection and choice.”

We’ll then need a separatist party with provincial and federal branches. Eventually they must win governments in the West, and win a strong presence in the Canadian Parliament.

There must be a referendum on separation with a question that is legally and logically clear, and won by at least 60% of the vote. And then we must negotiate a place in Confederation similar to Québec’s, where the maximum possible autonomy is given to the West, and where it is equal to other regions in every respect.

If that is agreed to it would probably make sense for us to remain within Canada. But failing that, a major marketing campaign must be undertaken to explain our position to the world, and serious separation negotiations must be commenced.

To those who say it can’t be done, I’ll say this. At the Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedom, George Jonas awards dinner the other evening, JCCF President John Carpay, related that when he visited Poland in 1987, people constantly told him that under communism things never changed, wouldn’t change, and couldn’t change because the Communists were so entrenched. Two years later the Berlin Wall came down.

Remember that as we continue to examine Alberta and Saskatchewan’s future within, or without Canada.

For our grand-kids, and yours

I’m Dave Reesor

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Alberta Politics Alberta Separtism Canadian Politics Conservatarians Politics Uncategorized

The Art of the Sacrifice

dwr.jpgIn previous blogs and social media posts I have stated my belief that Canada cannot be fixed, and that the path to a better future for our descendants is for Alberta and Saskatchewan to leave Canada and form their own nation. That will take sacrifice. Many have agreed, but as expected, some  have questioned my motives, my sanity, and even my loyalty to Canada. I no longer am.

I’ve been thinking about Saskatchewan and Alberta’s subordinate place in Canada since I was a teenager in the late 1950s, but more intensely since the late 1960s when Pierre Trudeau made his assault on Alberta through the National Energy Program. That outrage fomented a small separatist movement, but many still believed that, “If we just had a Conservative government, we’d be okay”.

So after Trudeau we briefly got “Conservative” Joe Clark. Joe Who? you might ask, and probably just did. Then more Trudeau senior, followed briefly by Liberal, John Turner.

Then “we got a Conservative”, Brian Mulroney, and while he had a couple of very positive achievements including a free trade agreement with the US and Mexico, (NAFTA), and scrapping the hidden, and constantly rising manufacturer’s sales tax (MST), for the visible GST, Mulroney also gave a major service contract for Canada’s F-18 fighters, to Montréal based Bombardier, even though Winnipeg’s Bristol Aerospace had won the bid on both technology and price. Whether Liberal or Conservative governments, the West is not an equal within Canada.

Like the Liberals, Mulroney continued running deficits until mid the 1990s, and Canada faced bankruptcy.

JT and QueensSince 2015 we’ve been led by an individual who, by any measure, is the least qualified and most divisive Prime Minister Canada has ever had; one who is distinguished  by his narcissism and totalitarian tendencies and unrelenting silliness; and his undisguised disdain for Alberta and Saskatchewan. Given even the possibility that he could again be Prime Minister, it’s clear that Canada cannot be fixed, and if we don’t know that by now I’m not sure what it would take.

So we need a negotiating strategy, and some strategies initially take us away from our  goal. Regarding the ongoing US trade dispute with China, Donald Trump said: “Somebody had to take China on. This is something that had to be done. The only difference is I am doing it. China has been ripping this country off for 25 years, for longer than that and it’s about time whether it’s good for our country or bad for our country short term. Long term it’s imperative that somebody does this.”

That’s a strategy.

Canada can possibly be fixed, by coercion – the subject of my last blog,  Breast-feeding and the Art of the Deal – but the coercion must be based on a credible and moderate and serious Alberta/Saskatchewan separatist movement. And again, the best way to turbocharge such a separatist movement is for Justin Trudeau to be re-elected in October. That’s the sacrifice needed to make the deal. Does that mean I’m going to vote Liberal? Nope, my stomach couldn’t take it. I’m voting PPC, on principle.  I’m aware that they’ll lose.

If you honestly believe that a Conservative government can fix Canada, good luck.  But I’m reminded of Einstein’s dictum: Doing the same thing, over and over again and expecting a different result is the definition of insanity. If you believe that a separatist movement is necessary, but after we get rid of Trudeau, that’s a triumph of hope over history. Conservative governments haven’t, and can’t, create permanent change.

Trudeau and his ilk are a problem for the rest of Canada to deal with, and they have the votes to fix it. But for Alberta and Saskatchewan separatists, a Trudeau re-election in October is the sacrifice, and catalyst, that is needed.

I feel nauseated.

I’m Dave Reesor

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Alberta Politics Alberta Separtism Canadian Politics Politics Uncategorized

Breast Feeding, and The Art of the Deal

dwr.jpgOur oldest grandson is 24 and has finished his education as a journeyman electrician, and now plans to become an electrical engineer. He’s had a considerable amount of experience, but I doubt that he’s one bit better at negotiating than he was when he was three months old. Because, as a baby, even though he couldn’t walk or talk, the moment he became hungry, everyone knew. One minute he’d be sleeping soundly, then 10 seconds later demanding food at the top of his very loud voice. It was negotiating by blackmail, and he always won. The deal? Feed me now, or suffer!

And so we negotiate our way through life, and that negotiating always involves a degree of blackmail. Some of it is quite benign, but necessary. I want to buy a house; you want to sell a house. I have this much money; you want this much money. And so, you negotiate. But behind the negotiation is the little bitty bit of blackmail that says: “If you don’t agree to sell at my price, I’ll walk and you’ll be stuck with your house”, and on the other side: “If you don’t give me the money I want, you can’t have this house, and I happen to know that you really want it.”

It’s a good bet that Québec politicians are required to read Donald Trump’s book: “The Art of the Deal”, because they’re always saying: “Give us what we want, or we’ll walk – away from Canada.” And why not; the blackmail has worked perfectly for at least 60 years now. Even though Québec would, at least initially, be much poorer as an independent country than it is now as the pampered child of Confederation, their threats of separation are taken seriously.

5282490d-69b3-4a25-9898-9c5c2e0345e2During the 1995 Québec referendum on separation in which Quebeckers came within a hair’s breadth of voting to separate from Canada, Prime Minister Jean Chretien was reported to have been in a state of utter panic over the possibility that he might soon be presiding over the breakup of Canada. (Cartoon by Dewar of Ottawa Citizen)

As a reward for their decades of blackmail, Québec has been granted privileges that no other province could dream of. On the other hand, the Canadian government, and even neighbouring provinces have taken severe actions against Alberta and Saskatchewan, that no one would dream of taking against Québec.

**I suggested that Québec would be poorer, initially, if it separated, because I honestly believe that if Québec left, or were kicked out of the nest, in a few years they would learn to fly on their own. Welfare dependency is learned and it can be unlearned, especially when the unlearning is assisted by the bite of reality.

So, my sincerely held belief is that Alberta and Saskatchewan must begin the process of developing a carefully thought out, and credible, and sincere movement to separate from Canada if there are not some fundamental changes to the way Canada is structured and administered. In other words, we need to take a page out of Québec’s playbook and develop our own blackmail strategy. And we have the financial muscle to be entirely serious about it.

As I suggested in my last blog, there’s nothing to keep us within Canada except sentimentality, and many of us are running out of that very quickly.

Next blog: Chess and the Art of the Sacrifice

I’m Dave Reesor

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Alberta Politics Alberta Separtism Bureaucracy Canadian Politics Freedom Uncategorized

Canada and the EU

dwr.jpgIt’s been a busy summer, yet Meritha and I have had several occasions to kick back and enjoy some of the sporadic stretches of great Calgary weather. One of our favourite things to do is go to Calgary’s East Village and walk along the river; one of the rare places our city fathers and administrators are doing a great job, and then find a place to sit and have a cold drink.

One such occasion led us into a conversation with a sparkling thirty-something German couple at the table next to ours, who turned out to be widely traveled teachers. (I know, Germans aren’t known to sparkle, but this couple did!) They’d been in Western Canada for nearly 3 weeks and were leaving for Germany the next day. The conversation lasted two hours, maybe more.

They were impressed with Canada and its immense size, and the friendliness of the people. They were even impressed with the size of the enclosures for the animals at the Calgary Zoo, which surprised me as I had always believed that Berlin’s zoo, which is more world-famous, was also probably more advanced. Not so!

We eventually got to Canada’s current problems, and the issue of Western alienation. Somehow?? I brought up the fact that I believe that separation, or at least a serious threat of separation, is the only way to prevent my grandchildren and great-grandchildren from going through the same divisive and disrespectful relationship with Central and Eastern Canada that we are currently experiencing. They were astonished that Canada could be so divided.

Another topic that came up was Brexit, and the EU. At the beginning of our conversation, the young couple had indicated that they were great supporters of the EU, and I expect that that is a common German attitude, perhaps because Germany considers itself the leader of the EU, and the leader of Europe. (Maybe like Ontario and Québec see themselves as the arbiters of all things Canadian.)

But that led me to pointing out that, in practical terms, there is no way to make a German and an Italian; the former proud of their hard work  and the latter of their dolce vita, or sweet life, think of him or herself first as “Europeans”.

I allowed that I’d always believed that the European Common Market was a great idea, but that the European Union, and its misguided attempts to get Germans and French and Italians to identify themselves primarily as Europeans, subject to the whims of bureaucrats in Brussels, was bound to fail. The insurmountable obstacle to this pipe-dream isn’t fundamentally ethnicity, it is cultural immutability.

At that point the conversation took an interesting turn, because the man, Frank, commented: “Maybe Canada is like the European Union”. And as much as I’ve thought about the West’s place in Confederation over the last 60 years, I had never thought of it exactly in that way before, and I told him so. I think it was astonishingly insightful.

Because we do have the same basic problem in Canada as the EU. Unlike the United States with its revolutionary war and its civil war and its existential battle against the Japanese in the Pacific, and its unsavory but storied conquest of  the lower 48, Canada has no unifying story other than the CPR, and some World War I and II battles like Vimy Ridge, and Juno Beach.

We all have relatives in Canada, but often we have even more relatives in the United States and overseas. In essence, Canada is a hodgepodge of cultures assembled to halt the advance of American hegemony in the latter half of the 19th century. Increasingly, that’s not enough to keep us together.

Image result for Trudeau in IndiaAnd when some elements of Canadian culture are prepared to elect, as Prime Minister, someone so singularly unprepared to lead and unite Canada as Justin Trudeau was, and then, in spite of his arrogance and vanity and dishonesty and divisiveness and corruption, and just plain silliness, great numbers of them are now prepared to try to elect him again, then I have no wish for my grandchildren and great-grandchildren to be citizens of that sort of country. And the belief that a Conservative government is going to fundamentally change anything, is a triumph of hope over history. More on that next blog.

It’s time, metaphorically, to begin packing, and even if it takes a generation, we need to prepare to exit. Let me know your thoughts.

I’m Dave Reesor

 

 

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Alberta Politics Alberta Separtism Bureaucracy Politics

A Better Country?

dwr.jpgOn Canada Day, Paula Simons wrote an article in the Edmonton Journal entitled: “My Canada includes Alberta.” Heartwarming, if it were true.

But Alberta’s hurting, and it’s clear that some of our fellow provinces, and, most egregiously, the Canadian government, are deliberately adding to the pain.

Ms. Simons trots out the usual arguments. “We are a landlocked province, with an economy largely reliant on international trade. Do we really imagine that it will be easier for us to get our oil, our wheat, our beef, our canola, our lentils, to market if we’re cut off from any coast?

Does she mean more cut off than we are now? Does she actually believe that BC will block the railways which carry hundreds of thousands of containers from BC ports to distribution centres from Alberta to Newfoundland, or that Québec and Ontario will stop trains from moving west? Or that activists will block pipelines more successfully than they do now? Seems to me that a blocked pipeline is a blocked pipeline.

Simons frets about investor confidence in a new country, so let’s look at Singapore which became an independent country in 1965. They began with massive unemployment, a lack of housing, no natural resources, and almost no land – Singapore covers 722 km²; Calgary 825 km². Together, Alberta and Saskatchewan have 1,300,000 km², and massive natural resources that the world needs.

Within 35 years of independence Singapore was one of the richest countries in the world. It’s a world class banking and tech centre, and  even, get this, the central hub for the Asian oil industry. Singapore’s population is 5.6 million; Alberta and Saskatchewan’s combined is 5.4 million, and there’s almost unlimited room to grow.

Simons points out that Alberta is home to 45 First Nations, which control 140 separate reserves. She asks: “Do separatists imagine that all those First Nations will also want to leave Canada?”

It wouldn’t surprise me. When Canada’s indigenous people were asked in a recent poll if they felt respected by the federal government, and felt like a valued part of Canada, a whopping 66% said NO. (I’d be extremely interested in feedback from Indigenous Albertans on this.) In the same poll, only 20% of indigenous people think Justin Trudeau should be re-elected this fall.

It certainly seems that Albertans, including the vast majority of indigenous people are on exactly the same page. Albertans of all backgrounds are tired of being taken advantage of, or stymied by, our nanny-state. Alberta’s indigenous communities are chockablock with entrepreneurs that are ready to go, if only the nanny-state would get out of the way. Imagine getting rid of the stifling bureaucracy, until recently called; “Indian Affairs”.

Simons enthuses: “For all its flaws, and for all its systemic injustices, this is a truly extraordinary country, a nation-state built, not on ideology or ethno-nationalism, but on ideals of tolerance, inclusion and rational compromise.” Nation State? But Justin Trudeau has already told the world that Canada is “post national”.

JT and QueensNational, or post-national, whether it’s Justin Trudeau and his government, or the law societies of British Columbia and Ontario, in today’s Canada, tolerance, inclusion, and compromise apply only if you affirm  the latest Progressivist ideology. Otherwise you are excluded from federal programs, you are not allowed to open a law school, and you can end up in jail if you don’t mouth the approved pronouns.

Simons asserts that: “Canada is a remarkable experiment”, but then admits: “It doesn’t always succeed.”  Indeed, it succeeds less and less. In a country where the Constitution is regarded as, “A Living Tree”, onto which Left-Wing activists can graft whichever Progressivist ideology happens to be trending at the moment, conservatism and common sense and the freedoms gained over 800 years are being forced to the periphery. And Canada’s constitution and amending formula guarantee that there is no way to get them back.

For her emotive clincher, Ms. Simons notes that the Latin motto on Canada’s coat of arms means “They desire a better country.”

Me too. Indeed I dream of a Best Country, but it’s clear that’s no longer possible in Canada. And that’s why I’m a separatist.

I’m Dave Reesor

Next Blog: A History of Disrespect.